Premier Issue

businesshealth® newsletter
Premier Issue vol. 1-1
Editorial
Patient Safety - Are Canadian Hospitals  "Taking Care of Business?"

View from the Top
Craig Wallwin, Wallwin Electrical Services

Bottom Line
Turning around short term disability Costs

Doctor On Call
E. Douglas Gat, MD. National Medical Director, Group Disability Manulife Financial

 

In This Issue

Craig Wallwin, Wallwin Electrical Services - Q: Craig, what motivated you to get involved in a workplace health initiative? It was actually very personal. I had a collapsed lung in February 2001, but the consequences really didn’t sink in until it re-collapsed a year later. After starting a personal rehabilitation program, I began feeling much better and had a lot more energy. I realized what was good for me might also be good for my employees. Read More »
E. Douglas Gat, MD - In "A Primer on Diabetes", two arguments are presented: 1) Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and its complications have high impact on health and cost, and 2) Interventions can positively impact the consequences of the illness. So, the big question is: How do we improve t Read More »
Patient Safety - Are Canadian Hospitals "Taking Care of Business"? - In 2002, the Quebec Government passed legislation that obliges all authorities to report medical errors. In 2003, the federal government and five provinces (NL, NB, QC, ON, AB) promised develop guarantees of timely care. In March 2004, a class action lawsuit was authorized by the QC Superior Court for 10,000 breast cancer patients who experienced delays exceeding eight weeks in accessing radiation therapy. Read More »
Turning around short term disability costs - First the good news... At Blount Canada, periodic employee satisfaction surveys reveal high confidence in the company’s health and safety programs, and feedback that the company is a good place to work. Despite these indicators of a strong workplace culture, a review undertaken in 2000 showed rapid increases in absence and disability costs. Read More »
A Primer on Diabetes - What is Diabetes? Normally, insulin helps cells use blood sugar (glucose), but this mechanism is upset in diabetics. Type 1 diabetic patients, about 10% of all cases, are insulin-dependent. Type 2 is much more common, but less severe. In Type 2, your body either cannot produce enough insulin or does not effectively use the insulin it makes. Control can be achieved through diet, exercise, and hypoglycemic pills. Without proper control, Type 2 patients are most likely to progress to Type 1, and many of those will develop serious health issues. Read More »
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